Re-posting this from the Bristol Editor blog, as an example of how not to deliver PR. Read it and learn folks.

…and the dubious award goes to these guys.

A huge thumbs-down to the PR Directors at PR firm Dada.co.uk today: following a mis-pitch yesterday on behalf of their client Whyte & Mackay, in which a press release on the drinks firm’s re-brand was sent to a printing industry-based Newsroom (ie mine) a follow-up email was sent by myself, asking the PR Account Director to remove us from their irrelevant PR issues.

Email received back, apologies accepted, we all move on and continue to cypher the 250 daily emails from PRs.

Or so I thought.

This morning, another email from a different PR Account Director at Dada, telling me about the wonders of how Whyte & Mackay are using Twitter to promote and launch Campaigns for consumers. Fabulous. And totally irrelevant. Again.

Many thanks to the second PR Director at Dada – this guy. He was too busy to take my call earlier, asking if they could actually confirm that they had removed our newsroom email address from their database, and if they would please, please, please stop PR Spamming us. Too busy to talk to the Press? Another clanger for a PR firm to commit.

So, in the absence of a decent resolution, here we are.

To top it all, Dada’s PR pitch on their site claims that ‘No-one can offer you a PR service like DADA’ and – for completely the wrong reasons – I am now inclined to agree.

Now pass me that chocolate fireguard, it could come in useful.

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What if…when your PR submits content to a journalist – specifically an online journalist – they have given quotes from you the client which include optimised, industry-relevant, search engine-friendly keywords within the quote?

It would be published intact by the Press, as it’s a direct quote adding value to the story or issue to be published. PR which actually does more than a vanity hit in the media. Powerful huh?!

But your PR consultant is probably already advocating this kind of integrated approach to PR and online exposure already…

Top 10 tips here from a seasoned Editor for PRs to observe and use – excellent stuff!

“Here’s a starting point: if I had to define the Top 10 things to remember in delivering good PR to the media, they would be:

1. Remember it is the story that counts, not the ego

2. The editor is not your pal, he is a media professional looking for editorial of interest to a discerning and fussy readership

3. Your PR will be competing with many other stories and news items hourly

4. Make sure you have something different, interesting and unique to offer

5. Get to know your target publications and media thoroughly before you make any direct PR-based contact

6. If your PR gets knocked back the first time, deal with it. Be persistent and take a different angle next time

7. Make sure you supply outstanding images with all PR submitted

8. Remember that there are different rules of media engagement for online vs. offline media

9. PR yourself widely, across as many sources, publications, forums, blogs, tweets as possible

10. Get ready to deliver consistent, month-after-month PR. One-off hits usually under-deliver”

After throwing my thoughts on the subject into the arena, there are further valuable hints and tips here on that trickiest of subjects – the winning press release. There are many, many PRs that need to read, digest and utilise the information shared. Enjoy!

The future of PR is here – watch out traditional Ab Fabs!

And here is a great example. Enjoy!

Awful story. Terrible PR – well, to be fair it made into the Telegraph, but that’s no measure of the story’s strength.

The story? Schoolkids here are being given a fiver to..wait for it…put rubbish in bins. Tenuous in the extreme. Who is worse – the PR who pitched the story, or the journalist who wrote up the press release? If your PR is as lazy as this, hire another Agency.

I’ll give a fiver to anybody who can spot the guilty PR party. Hint: the anti-litter scheme is sponsored by Sainsburys. Ahem.

This tip is going to annoy all those PR Agencies which try and advocate separate content for all media relations, so they can charge a copyright fee for every new content distribution on behalf of their clients.

And the third tip?

Simple: re-use and re-distribute your PR content as many times as possible and in as many different places (online and offline) as possible. Gain extra exposure, increased content leverage, greater reach for your key messages, and – the main benefit for smaller businesses – added value for the same content across different channels and via re-usage. And no additional copyright fees!

So, how does this work? Again, it’s very simple.

You write a blog post – content position number one. Then consider this: extend it to form a press release for localised News outlets. Position number two. Tweak it slightly so it can then go to trade magazines. Position number three. Throw in some search keywords and push it out across online industry forums. Position number four. And why not also consider using the basis of the content for an email promo to your key clients too? Position number five. If its got wide enough appeal, push it across your Twitter and Friendfeed accounts too. Positions number six and seven.

Hey presto! One piece of content, slightly amended, and used in different formats and giving maximum return.

Of course, you’ll need an expert copywriter, media relations adviser, journalistic professional and clued-up blogger to assist you…but you may well know where to find one. If you’re not sure, email me. Happy to pass on relevant contacts.

It may seem like an obvious point, but…

I recall when working as a business editor on daily newspapers and industry magazines that amongst the plethora of PR submitted for consideration on News and Feature editorials, much of it was sub-standard: too fluffy, no news value, poor angles, too much selling, not relevant to the readerships, awful images, or no accompanying images…to name but a few of the common errors in basic media relations.

You might think that these errors came from untrained, hopeful business owners or marketing directors? No. I am reffering to PR delivered by ‘professionals’ on behalf of clients. Clients who were being mis-sold the promise of effective PR to the Press.

When I use the phrase Press, I mean editors working online, offline and in any media medium which readerships might visit: let’s face it, the days of newspaper dominance are long gone, and any PR who is not advocating to clients utilising a mix of digital PR in their media relations efforts is seriously mis-representing any client in the UK today.

So, to make your PR work harder – as well as introducing SEO copy into your quotes for online PR submissions, also consider the following: industry forums, commentary opportunities on relevant newsfeeds, search engine keywords into your press releases for posting on your blog and online within your networks where relevant. In short, utilise the web. It works if you work it!

What if…when your PR submits content to a journalist – specifically an online journalist – they have given quotes from you the client which include optimised, industry-relevant, search engine-friendly keywords within the quote?

It would be published intact by the Press, as it’s a direct quote adding value to the story or issue to be published. PR which actually does more than a vanity hit in the media. Powerful huh?!

But your PR consultant is probably already advocating this kind of integrated approach to PR and online exposure already…